African-American History & Culture

Culture shapes lives. 

“There were no African Americans before the Transatlantic Slave Trade. A new culture emerged out of the trauma of that history and through traditions made and remade on new shores. This self-creation is everywhere in the day-to- day lives of African Americans. It’s in the food eaten, the languages spoken, the art created, and many other forms of cultural expression. Held within and passed through families and communities, African American culture reflects beliefs, informs behavior, fosters creativity, and most of all, sustains the spirit during times of overwhelming adversity.”  – National Museum of African-American History & Culture

A Veteran’s Day salute to Cpl Wm. H. Carney, 38th US Colored Troops

A Veteran’s Day salute to Cpl Wm. H. Carney, 38th US Colored Troops

Union Church is located a few miles northwest of Greensboro, MD. A grave marker still stands a few yards from the church door. The name on the stone is faded but still legible:
CORPL
Wm. H. Carney
Co I
38 U.S. C.I.

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I walked 16 miles home to Tuckahoe

I walked 16 miles home to Tuckahoe

I walked 16 miles from Easton to my father’s. I knocked at the door and said, “Who lives here?” Father answered by saying, “Who is that?”
I said, “Me.” Then mother said, “That’s Alexander”– showing a mother never forgets her child.

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Who made you free?

Who made you free, young Alexander?
Your enslaved father?
Your freed mother?

How were you free, Alexander?
Free to sit beside the Tuckahoe,
read holy books and
toss pebbles into the water,
listen to Aunt Hester’s screams on the other side?

Free to walk away from the Tuckahoe and never return?
But you did return.

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After these Times of Trouble, the Church went down

Reverend Jeremiah Miller was jailed in Easton.
He prophecied the Lord would shake the town that day.
After he was driven out, the church went down in that part of Maryland,
until Bishop Wayman returned and set it right.

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Do you still see white horses over in those dark woods?

Do you still see white horses over in those dark woods?

Next morning Rev. C.W. Cannon rode some miles and stopped, and thought,
The neighing of my mare is a sign that something will befall me.
He saw horses hitched in the dark woods.
He prayed the Lord would drive his pursuers away,
He rode through the swamp
then urged his beautiful mare to leap the mill race,
while hunting dogs chased them.

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Deep Branch Chapel, near the place I was born

Deep Branch Chapel, near the place I was born

Near the place I was born,
Tuckahoe,
I dedicated Deep Branch Chapel.
Then I hastened and got off.

It’s 1874.

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Long road back to Tuckahoe

Long road back to Tuckahoe

Bishop Wayman,
Do you come from Tuckahoe?
Are you a son of Francis Wayman of Caroline County?

I am. And now tell me,
Did Charlie and Button pull your wagon all the way
from Tuckahoe to Ohio?

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His color was black, his voice commanding, deep.

His color was black, his voice commanding, deep.

They wrote:
His color was black.
His features were strong.
His voice was commanding, deep.
His white friends in Denton
always came out
to hear him preach.
So did Generals, Governors, and Presidents.
Born on the Tuckahoe, 1821
(before Fred Bailey
across the river
escaped),
Bishop Wayman died last week.

December 17, 1895

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