Restoring and Preserving the Tuckahoe Neck Quaker Meetinghouse

Restoring and Preserving the Tuckahoe Neck Quaker Meetinghouse

The Friends of the Tuckahoe Neck Quaker Meeting House originally planned to start with the restoration on the west side of the building. (The east side was restored in 2019.) Restoration plans have expanded to include the three remaining sides. We have received donations from individuals, a religious group, and a DAR Historic Preservation Grant. Funding for this project was made possible through the sponsorship of the General Perry Benson Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution. But more donations are needed. Read more …

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Getting the History Right – Tuckahoe Neck Quaker Meetinghouse

Getting the History Right – Tuckahoe Neck Quaker Meetinghouse

The roadside historical marker tells us only the basics. And some of that is wrong. Read more …

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Where the Dead Rise Up

Where the Dead Rise Up

You might not see them from the road. You have to stop and get out. Walk around for a closer look. Crypts floating to the surface.

This is St. Paul AME Church. It’s one of dozens of segregated black churches that organized in Caroline County and throughout the Eastern Shore of Maryland after 1865.

#blackhistorymatters

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Haunted by the Heroes of 1776

Haunted by the Heroes of 1776

Caroline County sent six regimental, militia, and staff colonels to war against British imperial troops during 1776-1783:

Col. Peter Adams
Col. Matthew Driver
Col. Philip Feddiman
Col. Benson Stainton
Col. William Richardson
Col. William Whiteley

We know where they fought. But we know nearly nothing about the civilian life and final resting place of most of them –  Adams, Feddiman, Driver, and Stainton.

The tombs of Richardson and Whiteley are in forgotten places. The rest are lost.

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How Old Black Churches Die

How Old Black Churches Die

I visited the St. Paul’s AME Church a few weeks ago. The scene was incredible. Pulpit, piano, pews, and stained glass were still in place. I found hand-hewn sill timbers – evidence that the building was indeed built in the early 1800s, as noted by one source.

The roof is caving in. One of the newer headstones in the graveyard was deliberately toppled off its pediment. Within a generation, this old church building will die and disappear into the landscape like many others. The gravestones will remain hidden under tangled vines for a thousand years. Then they will disappear, too.

#blackhistorymatters

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