I walked 16 miles home to Tuckahoe

I walked 16 miles from Easton to my father’s.

I knocked at the door and said, “Who lives here?”
Father answered by saying, “Who is that?”
I said,   “Me.”
Then mother said, “That’s Alexander”–
showing a mother never forgets her child.


Bishop Wayman at Tuscola ILThe Legacy of A.M.E Bishop A.W. Wayman
of Tuckahoe Neck, Caroline County, Maryland

 
Bishop Wayman recollects:

In the month of October [1848] I concluded to go home to Eastern Shore and see my father and mother. Accordingly I left Washington for Baltimore; then took the steamboat for Easton, and reached there about 5 P. M. It was said to be about sixteen miles from Easton to my father’s. There was no way to ride, so I took the same road that I traveled eight years before when I first left home, and by ten o’clock I was at father’s.

Before knocking at the door I went to the barn-yard to look at the cattle and see if I could recognize any of those that were there when I left, when I saw the ox that the boys called “Noble”.

Then I knocked at the door and said, “Who lives here?” Father answered by saying, “Who is that?” I said,   “Me.” Then mother said, “That’s Alexander”– showing a mother never forgets her child.

On the following Sunday I was invited to fill the pulpit of the M. E. Church in Denton, the very town from which eighteen years before Rev. N. C. W. Cannon had to run. As I rode along to and from Denton I looked for the old A. M. E. Church, but it was gone.  

After spending a few days with my relatives I returned to Washington, D. C., and commenced my work. The winter was exceedingly pleasant.

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