Category Archives: Black History

The black blacksmith with a bellowy laugh

In West Denton … there were two blacksmith Shops serving the farmers and residents of the area. One was operated by a Negro named Walter Moore …  I doubt if any kingdom ever fell because Walter’s nails came loose.

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The true reason why Frederick Douglass gave his heart to Anna Murray

Rosetta Douglass Sprague wrote in the memoir about her mother, Anna Murray Douglass, that young Frederick Bailey “gave his heart” to Anna Murray, and she “sympathized with him and she devoted all her energies to assist him” to escape slavery in Baltimore.

Why Anna Murray?

Because she was the girl from down home in Tuckahoe Neck.

Continue reading The true reason why Frederick Douglass gave his heart to Anna Murray

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First woman President of NAACP got her start in Denton

The first woman president of the NAACP, Dr. Enolia P. McMillan, started her professional career as a teacher in Caroline County in 1927, when she taught at the Denton segregated black high school.  Continue reading First woman President of NAACP got her start in Denton

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Helicopter Flyover: Historic sites of segregated black schools, 1875-1900

Almost all of the old buildings are gone.  But we can lay old maps over aerial and satellite imagery of Caroline County to find the places where they once stood.

Do the “helicopter tour” of the school sites as they look today.  We fly north to south –  1000 feet above each of 14 sites.  Click any site name to explore the site in an interactive map.

The helicopter route map below shows all 14 sites.

Continue reading Helicopter Flyover: Historic sites of segregated black schools, 1875-1900

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News went back to Caroline that I was shot and killed

“You know the feelings of the white people here in Delaware.
Are you ready to die?”

I said, None of these things move me.
I never was so inspired to speak since the day I was born.

And news went back to Caroline,
that I was shot and killed.

Continue reading News went back to Caroline that I was shot and killed

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Meet the young black woman from Caroline County who helped Frederick Douglass escape

She was born free in Caroline County.  He was born across the river in Talbot, enslaved.

They followed separate paths to Baltimore.  Anna met Frederick for the first time at the city wharves.  He was 19, she was 24.

Frederick was an enslaved shipbuilder.   Anna had a day job and her own business.  She had means.  She told him he should escape his bondage and live free.

Anna would lose everything if caught aiding and abetting a slave’s escape.  She gave him sailor’s clothes for disguise, money for the trip north, and contacts with the Underground Railroad.

Continue reading Meet the young black woman from Caroline County who helped Frederick Douglass escape

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A Veteran’s Day salute to Cpl Wm. H. Carney, 38th US Colored Troops

Grave marker at Union Church

Union Church is located a few miles northwest of Greensboro, MD.   A grave marker still stands a few yards from the church door.  The name on the stone is faded but still legible:

CORPL
Wm. H. Carney
Co I
38 U.S.  C.I.

No date of birth or death is shown.

2015-05-25 memorial day (1)

Corporal William H. Carney, Company I, US Colored Infantry

Cpl Carney is listed in rosters of the 38th Regiment, U.S. Colored Troops.  The 38th Regiment was formed in January 1864 near Norfolk, VA and saw hard fighting in these battles around Richmond during September-October 1864:

  • Chaffin’s Farm
  • New Market Heights
  • Deep Bottom
  • Fair Oaks

One narrative of the Battle of New Market Heights describes the fortitude and heroism of non-commissioned officers of the 38th USCT such as Cpl Carney.  Casualty totals for these regiments at the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm also tell of courage and heroism.

USCT losses Chaffins Farm
From all engagements in 1864 and 1865, the 38th USCT lost

  • 1 officer and 42 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded
  • 2 officers and 192 enlisted men lost to disease.
  • Total deaths: 237

After the surrender of Confederate armies in Virginia and North Carolina, the 38th USCT was deployed to Texas to counter  France’s military intervention in Mexico.  The regiment served at Brownsville, at various points on the Rio Grande, and at Brazos Santiago, Indianola, and Galveston until January 1867. Cpl Carney and his black comrades were mustered out on January 25, 1867.

Civil War veteran William H. Carney of Goldsboro, MD

A search of Denton Journal articles from 1865 produced a few details about Caroline County’s black Civil War veteran.  In 1893, William H. Carney was listed among the Civil War veterans in Caroline County who were still receiving veterans’ pensions.  In March 1895, Carney sought damages from the county when his horse fell through the roadway of the county-maintained bridge between Goldsboro and Bridgetown, DE.

Grave photos and Denton Journal images are here.

The Corporal William H. Carney grave site is here:


View larger map

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I walked 16 miles home to Tuckahoe

I walked 16 miles from Easton to my father’s.

I knocked at the door and said, “Who lives here?”
Father answered by saying, “Who is that?”
I said,   “Me.”
Then mother said, “That’s Alexander”–
showing a mother never forgets her child.


Bishop Wayman at Tuscola ILThe Legacy of A.M.E Bishop A.W. Wayman
of Tuckahoe Neck, Caroline County, Maryland

  Continue reading I walked 16 miles home to Tuckahoe

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Who made you free?

Who made you free, young Alexander?
Your enslaved father?
Your freed mother?

How were you free, Alexander?
Free to sit beside the Tuckahoe,
read holy books and
toss pebbles into the water,
listen to Aunt Hester’s screams on
 the other side?

Free to walk away from the Tuckahoe and never return?
But you did return.

It’s 1821.    Here.


Bishop Wayman at Tuscola ILThe Legacy of A.M.E Bishop A.W. Wayman
of Tuckahoe Neck, Caroline County, Maryland

  Continue reading Who made you free?

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There was a colored church down by the river crossing

I remember there was a colored church in the woods down by the river. If you passed by on the road that takes you over Sandy Island Bridge into Delaware, you could hear them singing on the Sabbath.  That was back in the ’70s.

"Col Ch" at the upper Choptank crossing
“Col Ch” at the upper Choptank crossing

It’s 1875.  Here.

Continue reading There was a colored church down by the river crossing

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