After these Times of Trouble, the Church went down

Reverend Jeremiah Miller was jailed in Easton.
He prophecied the Lord would shake the town that day.
After he was driven out, the church went down in that part of Maryland.
Gone, until Bishop Wayman returned.

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Do you still see white horses over in those dark woods?

They said, Rev. Noah C.W. Cannon is a dangerous man.

He preached at Denton on Sunday.
And would preach at my father’s
out in the country that week.
He was admired by all who heard him.

But that night came the constable with other men from town
and arrested him for the murder of women and children.
Rev. Cannon told the Justice, Look at me. I am not that mulatto.
(For he was a very dark man.)
And the Justice released him.
But he did not sleep well that night, thinking
it was time to get out of that place.
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Deep Branch Chapel, near the place I was born

Near the place I was born,
Tuckahoe,
I dedicated Deep Branch Chapel.
Then I hastened and got off.

It’s 1874.  Here.


Bishop Wayman at Tuscola ILThe Legacy of A.M.E Bishop A.W. Wayman
of Tuckahoe Neck, Caroline County, Maryland

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News went back to Caroline that I was shot and killed

“You know the feelings of the white people here in Delaware.
Are you ready to die?”

I said, None of these things move me.
I never was so inspired to speak since the day I was born.

And news went back to Caroline,
that I was shot and killed.

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Long ride back to Tuckahoe

Bishop Wayman,
Do you come from Tuckahoe?
Are you a son of Francis Wayman of Caroline County?

I am.  And now tell me,
Did Charlie and Button pull your wagon all the way
from Tuckahoe to Ohio?

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His color was black

They wrote:
His color was black.

His features were strong.
His voice was commanding, deep.
His white friends in Denton
always came out
to hear him preach.
Like-wise Generals, Governors, and Presidents.
Born on the Tuckahoe, 1821
(before Fred Bailey
across the river
escaped),
Bishop Wayman died last week.

It’s 1895.  Here.


Bishop Wayman at Tuscola ILThe Legacy of A.M.E Bishop A.W. Wayman
of Tuckahoe Neck, Caroline County, Maryland

Learn more:

Do you still see white horses over in those dark woods? — 1830

After these Times of Trouble, the Church went down — 1830-1868

News went back to Caroline that I was shot and killed — 1866

Long ride back to Tuckahoe  –  1870s

Deep Branch Chapel, near the place I was born — 1874

 

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Here is your new water trail map. Don’t get it wet.

The Choptank and Tuckahoe Water Trail is only a memory now.

But the Choptank is still there.   So is the Tuckahoe.   So is the water.  So, hit the trail!  Splash ! ! !


The Old Harford Town Maritime Center (OHTMC) in West Denton sank into the river a decade ago.  OHTMC’s  big, beautiful, glossy river trail map and guide soon went out of print.

It was hard to fold, anyway.

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Maggie Lee is dead, Jake.

I know, I know . . .   She still shows up in the Registry of National Historic Landmarks.    But I tell you, Jake, Maggie Lee died 10 years ago in West Denton!   I have police photos to prove it.


The Chesapeake Bay skipjack Maggie Lee is listed in the Registry of National Historic Landmarks.  Here is how she’s described by the Maryland Historic Trust:

This vessel is a 51′ long two sail bateau, or V-bottomed deadrise centerboard sloop, commonly referred to as a skipjack. She was built in 1903 in Pocomoke City, Maryland, for the oyster dredging fleet. She has a beam of 16′, a depth of 3.8′, and a net tonnage of 8 register tons. …  Maggie Lee is of interest as being one of the older skipjacks still dredging in the Chesapeake fleet. She was built in 1903 in Pocomoke City, Maryland, following traditional Bay-area design and construction methods. She has worked in the oyster-dredging fleet since her building. The vessel is one of the 21 surviving working skipjacks to have been built previous to 1912.

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It’s 1875, By an Act of Congress

Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1875 by John B. Isler in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington DC.

It’s 1875.   Here.


We catch a glimpse of the Caroline County landscape in 1875, thanks to an Act of Congress.  The Office of the Librarian of Congress was apparently directed to create a large, detailed map of the county, probably in connection with the 1870 national census.

isler 480x

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Caroline’s other Colonel is not as Cool

They don’t like him or follow him.  So social media ignores him.  And history forgets him. How powerful they are!


Caroline County has her Revolutionary War hero and

  • Colonel Richardson High School
  • Colonel Richardson Middle School
  • Colonel Richardson’s tomb at Gilpin Point on the Choptank River
  • Colonel Richardson Maryland State Historical Society marker  on MD 16 between Denton and Preston

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